Travel Info

Monday, 12 April 2010 14:42 administrator
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Here follows some information that might be of assistance as you prepare for your trip to South or southern Africa - with us, of course! Active Image Active Image Active Image


TRAVEL INFORMATION

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

SOUTH AFRICA AND SWAZILAND
•    No visa required.
•    Passports should be valid for at least 30 days beyond the period of intended stay.
•    Sufficient funds.
•    A return or onward ticket.
•    At least two blank pages in your passport.
•    Yellow fever certificates are required if the journey starts or entails passing through the yellow fever belt of Africa or South America.

ZIMBABWE
•    Passport valid for at least 6 months from your date of entry.
•    Visa – obtainable at port of entry. US$50.00 per person, payable in cash. It is important to carry the exact amount with you, as change may not be available.
•    Return ticket to your country.
•    Sufficient funds to cover your stay in Zimbabwe.
•    Enough blank pages in your passport to fit the required entry visa.
•    No vaccination requirements - but contact your G.P. around 8 weeks before your trip to check whether this has changed in the interim.

ZAMBIA
•    Passport valid for at least 6 months from your date of entry.
•    Visa – obtainable at port of entry. US$50.00 per person, payable in cash. It is important to carry the exact amount with you, as change may not be available.
•    Return ticket to your country.
•    Sufficient funds to cover your stay in Zimbabwe.
•    At least two blank pages in your passport.
•    No vaccination requirements – but contact your G.P. around 8 weeks before your trip to check whether this has changed in the interim.
•    Proof of yellow-fever vaccination if entering from a country where it is endemic. (South Africa and Zimbabwe – not.)

BOTSWANA
•    No visa required.
•    Passports should be valid for at least 30 days beyond the period of intended stay.
•    Sufficient funds.
•    A return or onward ticket.
•    At least two blank pages in your passport.
•    Yellow fever certificates are required if the journey starts or entails passing through the yellow fever belt of Africa or South America.

MOCAMBIQUE
•    All foreign travelers in Mozambique must hold return/onward tickets, the necessary travel documentation for their next destination, and proof of sufficient funds to cover their expenses while in the country.
•    Visitors of most nationalities can obtain a 30-day tourist visa on arrival in Mozambique: the visa fee is US$66.00, and further 30-day extensions are possible.
•    A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required to enter Mozambique, if arriving within six days of leaving or transiting through an infected area.
•    It is highly recommended that your passport has at least six months validity remaining after your intended date of departure from your travel destination.

N.B. Please note that the above requirements might change – and it is therefore your responsibility to ensure that you have the necessary visas for every country you are visiting. Arrange your visas through your nearest embassy or consulate. We cannot be held responsible if you arrive without the necessary visas and are refused entry to a particular country.

VACCINATIONS
•    No vaccinations are required by law to enter South Africa, Swaziland, Namibia, Zimbabwe or Botswana if you arrive from North America, the UK, Europe, and Australia. However, if you are travelling from a region where Yellow Fever is endemic (eg. Kenya, Tanzania, tropical America), you will need to prove you have had the inoculation by presenting a valid international yellow fever inoculation certificate.
•    Both Typhoid and Hepatitis A vaccinations are recommended, and it is wise to ensure that your Polio and Tetanus shots are up to date.

MALARIA
•    Malaria is endemic in the sub-tropical regions of southern Africa. Visitors should take anti-malarial prophylactic medication. Consult your doctor for the most recent advice, but Mefloquine (Mefliam) or Doxycycline are currently recommended by South African authorities. General anti-mosquito precautions also need to be taken – eg. sleeping under a mosquito net, using insect repellents, wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants between dusk and dawn, when malaria-carrying mosquitoes are active. 

•    Travellers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area, and up to one year after returning home, should seek prompt medical attention and tell the physician their travel history and what anti-malarial they have been taking.

MONEY
•    A.T.M.’s are available in most centres, and at airports.
•    Visa and MasterCard credit cards are widely accepted throughout southern Africa.  American Express is less widely accepted – and only in South Africa. In Zimbabwe, Zambia and Botswana, many merchants will add a surcharge of 3 - 5% of the value of the transaction to cover bank charges. No other cards are accepted - including debit cards, bank cards and any other private bank cards not affiliated with Visa or MasterCard. Traveler’s checks will be accepted in South Africa at selected institutions only - we recommend avoiding them, if at all possible.
•    In addition to your credit card, it is recommended that you bring some cash for spending money, tips and so on. US Dollars, Pounds and Euros can easily be converted to local currency at the airport in either Johannesburg or Cape Town. You will be required to present your passport in order to exchange your foreign currency to local currency. Change your cash into local currency in South Africa or in the country you are traveling to rather than before leaving home, as local exchange rates are better.
•    In South Africa, Botswana and Namibia, you will not be able to use foreign currency. In Namibia, both the Namibian Dollar and South African Rand are accepted, and both have the same value. The same arrangement (dual currency system) applies in Swaziland and Lesotho. The Namibian, Swaziland and Lesotho currencies are, however, not accepted in South Africa, so make sure you don’t leave these countries with local currency.

TIME
•    South African Standard Time is 2 hours ahead of GMT, one hour ahead of Central European Winter Time, and 7 hours ahead of U.S. Eastern Standard Winter Time.
•    There are no time zone changes within South Africa, or between South Africa and her neighbours.

SECURITY
•    Crime is certainly a problem in South Africa, especially in big cities. However, some basic rules - which would really apply to wherever one is in the world - should keep one out of trouble :

# Passports, money, valuables, cameras should be locked in the hotel safe
# When walking in the cities, carry valuables discreetly and securely. Leave behind those items you won’t need.
# Never leave your property unattended in a public place.
# Avoid deserted areas even in daylight.
# Ensure that your hotel room door is locked when you are in the room and whenever you leave it.
# When driving, keep your doors locked, and do not pick up hitch hikers.
# In general, use your common sense, don’t look terrified or lost, and smile –
make friends!

ELECTRICITY
•    The standard power source in South Africa is 220 / 230 volts AC. The plug in use is Type M (three round pins). Adaptors for hair dryers and razors can be obtained locally.
•    Botswana uses a mix of the British-type plug (Type G - three rectangular pins) and the South African type plug (Type M - three round pins).
•    Zimbabwe uses the British-type plug. However, many of the Victoria Falls Hotels have dual South Africa / U.K. plug sockets.
•    It's best to get the relevant adapter on arrival (most airports), although most hotels are able to provide loan adapters.

TRADING HOURS
•    As a general rule, the following times apply :
#  Banks : weekdays from 09h00 to 15h30; Saturdays from 08h30 to 11h00
# Shops : weekdays from 09h00 to 17h00; Saturdays from 09h00 to 13h00.
•    In the major cities, these times are very often extended, and Sunday trade is common.

VAT (VALUE ADDED TAX)
•    VAT - set currently at 14% - is included in the retail price of most goods and services in South Africa. Foreign tourists may claim VAT refunds on goods
which they take out of South Africa. In order to do so, the original tax invoice must be retained - with a tax invoice number, date of issue, seller’s Vat registration number, plus name and address, the cost of the goods, a description of the goods, and the buyer’s name. Goods consumed or services rendered in the country do not qualify for VAT refunds.

TIPPING
•    A 10% tip to waiters, barmen, porters and taxi-drivers is customary - but depends on the standard of the service received. Casual, bored, lackadaisical service should NOT be tipped. Restaurants usually do not add service charges to the bill.

DRIVING
•    If a visitor’s driving licence is written in English, or includes a photograph, it will be accepted in South Africa. Otherwise, an International Driving Permit should be obtained before arrival.
•    Note that throughout southern Africa, cars travel on the LEFT hand side of the road!

TRAVEL INSURANCE
•    A travel insurance policy to cover theft, loss and medical problems is strongly advised. Travel agents will be able to advise in this regard.

WATER
•    South Africa is one of the few countries in the world where tap water is drinkable and of a very high standard. Bottled mineral waters are available, but are not necessary. The wine is even better!
•    In other southern African countries, bottled water is recommended.

WHAT TO BRING ALONG

•    Clothing          # Pack clothes for a warm climate (but something WARM for game drives!)
# Comfortable clothes and shoes for travelling
# As far as possible, light or neutral colours for the game parks
# Hat
# Swim suit and beach towel
# Light rain coat / wind breaker
# Comfortable walking shoes / boots
# Jersey / light-weight jacket for evening wear

•    Other             # Torch, spare film and camera batteries, sunblock (sun protection factor of 15 plus) and suntan lotion, binoculars, good pair of sunglasses, insect repellent spray or lotion, any prescription medicines
# Some US dollars in cash if you are traveling into
Zambia, Zimbabwe or Botswana

•    Cameras / film  # All camera and film equipment is available in all types in the cities and towns of southern Africa, and at major airports. All the top names are represented, and equipment can also be repaired.
# Be sure to bring all necessary extra batteries / film / back-up memory cards / battery chargers / download cables for your camera.

•    Passports        #A good idea is to copy the first few pages of your passport, your air ticket and other important documents, and carry these separately from the originals. In the event of loss, this will enable authorities to replace them quickly

LUGGAGE

•    Try to travel light - one always brings more than one needs! Try to limit baggage to a soft medium-sized travel bag and one smaller item of hand luggage.

INTERNET

•    All major centers in South Africa have access to the Internet. Cell phone coverage in South Africa is better than average, but obviously is not available in every corner of the country, particularly when visiting a National Park or safari lodge. Most hotels offer internet facilities, whether in your room or at a communal P.C. Many will offer WiFi but, unlike in the United States or Europe, you sometimes have to pay for the service.
•    If you plan to be in South Africa for an extended time, it is a good idea to purchase a local SIM card for your cellular phone. To do that, you will be required to provide proof that you are a genuine tourist, in the form of your reservation document and a copy of your passport.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 May 2015 10:54

Travel Quotes

Travel Quotes
Thursday, 12 August 2010

“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” Ernest Hemingway

"The only man I envy is the man who has not yet been to Africa - for he has so much to look forward to."
Richard Mullin.

"Tourists don't know where they've been; travellers don't know where they're going."
Paul Theroux.

“For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move.”

Robert Louis Stevenson, Travels with a Donkey.


“The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one's own country as a foreign land.”
G.K. Chesterton.


“If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home.”
James Michener.


“The journey not the arrival matters.”
T. S. Eliot.

“Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”
Mark Twain.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness.”
Mark Twain.


“We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.”
T.S. Eliot, Little Gidding – The Four Quartets.


“Everything in Africa bites, but the safari bug is worst of all.”
Brian Jackman.

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